Yoga

Adaptive Yoga: Making Yoga Accessible for Every Body – Healthline

Summary

Many people are intimidated to try yoga asana, the physical practice of yoga, because they worry that they won’t be flexible enough or strong enough.

Some assume you need all the right gear, down to the pants and yoga mat. Others have neurological deficits or physical limitations that they think will prevent them from doing a physical activity like yoga.

But all you need to do yoga is a body — in any form.

In fact, Matthew Sanford, founder of Mind Body Solutions, told H…….

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Many people are intimidated to try yoga asana, the physical practice of yoga, because they worry that they won’t be flexible enough or strong enough.

Some assume you need all the right gear, down to the pants and yoga mat. Others have neurological deficits or physical limitations that they think will prevent them from doing a physical activity like yoga.

But all you need to do yoga is a body — in any form.

In fact, Matthew Sanford, founder of Mind Body Solutions, told Healthline that no physical or neurological limitation has ever stopped him from teaching yoga to someone. He has taught yoga to individuals without limitations, those in wheelchairs, and even people in comas.

Sanford began teaching adaptive yoga in 1997. At the time, he was one of the first yoga teachers living with a spinal cord injury and complete paralysis. His classes and other adaptive yoga classes around the world prove that yoga really is for every body.

Adaptive yoga is a style of yoga that considers all bodies and abilities. It’s accessible to everyone, and multiple variations are taught, allowing the poses to be adapted to specific needs and abilities. Accessible yoga or adapted yoga are other common names for this practice.

Adaptive yoga classes tend to be quite individualized and are often taught in smaller group settings. They also move more slowly than most traditional classes, but don’t let the pacing fool you! You will still work up a sweat.

JoAnn Lyons, who has been teaching this style of yoga for 25 years, feels that all classes should really be taught as adaptive, as each of us should adapt the poses to fit our individual needs.

The senior teacher explains, “All yoga practices are personal, and every body is different.” However, she finds the title to be a helpful distinction for people of all abilities to know there’s a class style that suits them.

Based in the Bay Area, Lyons observes that many people may think that they can’t do yoga due to abilities, their age, or bodily changes. But adaptive yoga is focused on tailoring the poses to work for every body.

Summary

Adaptive yoga is a style of yoga that’s accessible for every body. Multiple variations are generally offered, allowing the poses to be adapted to people’s unique needs.

Adaptive yoga is an umbrella term that can include yoga for specific conditions like multiple sclerosis, yoga for people with physical disabilities, or even yoga for older adults.

If you have a specific injury, condition, or ability level that requires some degree of modification in a traditional yoga class, you might want to give adaptive yoga a try.

In addition to general adaptive yoga classes for all bodies and abilities, …….

Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness/adaptive-yoga